Goodhue County, Minnesota

 

Resume of Regiments and Companies

Following is a brief resume of the service of the Minnesota regiments and companies in which Goodhue county men were mustered:

First Infantry

The 1st Infantry was organized in April, 1861, went into camp at Fort Snelling; mustered in by Captain Anderson D. Nelson, U. S. A., on the 29th ordered to Washington, D. C, June 14, 1861. The following is a sketch of the marches, battles, sieges and skirmishes in which this regiment participated:

First Bull Run, July 21, 1861
Edwards Ferry. October 22, 1861
Yorktown, May 7, 1862
Fair Oaks, June 1, 1862
Peach Orchard, June 29, 1862
Savage Station, June 29, 1862
Glendale, June 30, 1862
Nelson's Farm, June 30, 1862
Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862
Vienna, September 2, 1862
Antietam, September 17, 1862
First Fredericksburg, December 11, 12 and 13, 1862
Second Fredericksburg, May 3, 1863
Gettysburg, July 2 and 3, 1863 and
Bristow Station. October 14, 1863
Discharged at Fort Snelling May 5, 1864

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company F, Colonel William Colvill, enlisted and commissioned captain April 29, 1861 promoted major August 28, 1862; lieutenant colonel September 26, 1862, and colonel May 6, 1863 discharged with regiment May 5, 1864.

Major A. Edward Welch, commissioned first lieutenant April 29, 1861 promoted major November 5, 1861, and died at Nashville, Tenn., February 1, 1864.

Lieutenant Mark A. Hoyt, commissioned second lieutenant April 29, 1861 promoted to first lieutenant January 8, 1862; resigned July 18, 1862.

Captain Martin Maginnis, enlisted April 29, 1861 promoted second lieutenant September 17, 1862; first lieutenant September 17, 1862, and captain July 28, 1863; discharged with regiment May 4, 1864.

Lieutenant Hezekiah Bruce, enlisted April 29, 1861; promoted second lieutenant July 28, 1863; first lieutenant July 28, 1863 discharged with regiment May 4, 1864. Goodhue County had ninety-five soldiers in Company F and one in Company G.

Second Infantry

The 2nd Infantry was organized in July, 1861. Ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, October, 1861, and assigned to the Army of the Ohio.

The following embraces a sketch of the marches, battles and skirmishes in which this regiment participated:

Mill Spring, January 19, 1862
Siege of Corinth, April, 1862 transferred to the Army of the Tennessee
Bragg's Raid; Perryville, October 8, 1862 skirmishes of the Tullahoma campaign
Chickamauga, September 19 and 20, 1863
Mission Ridge. November 25, 1863
Veteranized January, 1864. Battles and skirmishes of the Atlanta campaign, viz.:
Resaca, June 14, 15 and 16, 1864
Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864
Jonesboro; Sherman's march through Georgia and the Carolinas
Bentonville, March 19, 1865
Discharged at Fort Snelling July 11, 1865

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Assistant surgeon, William Brown, commissioned September 5, 1862; promoted surgeon September 5, 1862; no record. Company I, Captain John Foot, mustered in July 30, 1861; resigned March 9, 1862.

First Lieutenant William S. Grow, mustered in July 30, 1861; appointed quartermaster.

Lieutenant William W. Wilson, enrolled June 26, 1861; promoted second lieutenant April 1, 1862, and first lieutenant July 19, 1862; resigned September 12, 1864.

Goodhue County had twenty soldiers in Company I, eight in Company K, two in Company B, six in Company C, one in Company F, and one in Company G.

Third Infantry

The 3rd Infantry was organized in October, 1861.

Ordered to Nashville, Tennessee, March 1862
Captured and paroled at Murfreesboro July, 1862
Ordered to St. Louis, Mo., thence to Minnesota
Engaged in the Indian expedition of 1862
Participated in the battle of Wood Lake, September, 1862
Ordered to Little Rock. Ark., November. 1863
Veteranized January, 1864
Engaged in battle of Fitzhugh's Woods, March 30, 1864
Ordered to Pine Bluff, Ark., April, 1864, and from there to Duvall's Bluff, September 2. 1865
Discharged at Fort Snelling.

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company D, Colonel Hans Mattson, commissioned captain Company D October 22, 1861; promoted major May 29, 1862; promoted lieutenant colonel July 15, 1863, and colonel April 15, 1864; discharged with the regiment September 2, 1865.

First Lieutenant Lars K. Aakers, commissioned October 3. 1861; resigned March 30, 1862.

Second Lieutenant Hans Enstrom, commissioned October 16, 1861; promoted first lieutenant March 30, 1862, and captain May 30, 1862 resigned August 2, 1862.

Company K, Captain Clinton Gurnee, enrolled October 23, 1861; dismissed December 1, 1862.

First Lieutenant Edward L. Baker, enrolled October 10, 1861; promoted captain December 1, 1862; resigned February 10, 1861.

Second Lieutenant Willit W. DeKay, enrolled October 23, 1861; promoted first lieutenant December 1, 1862, and captain February 11, 1861; resigned January 9, 1865.

Goodhue County had eighty-five soldiers in Company D, ninety in Company E, six in Company F, two in Company G, one in Company H and one in Company K.

Fourth Infantry

The 4th Infantry was organized December 23, 1861.

Ordered to Benton Barracks. Missouri, April 19, 1862. Assigned to Army of the Mississippi May 4, 1862.

Participated in the following marches, battles, sieges and skirmishes:

Siege of Corinth, April, 1862
Iuka, September 19, 1862
Corinth, October 3 and 4, 1862
Siege of Vicksburg, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, assault of Vicksburg, capture of Vicksburg, July 4, 1863
Transferred to 17th corps, to 15th corps
Mission Ridge, November 25, 1863
Veteranized January, 1864
Alatoona, July, 1864
Sherman's march through Georgia and the Carolinas
Bentonsville, March 20, 1865
Mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, July 19, 1865
Discharged at Fort Snelling

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company D, Second Lieutenant Harrison M. Stanton, enrolled October 10, 1861; died at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., June 8, 1862.

Solomon F. Brown, enrolled October 8, 1861 promoted second lieutenant June 9, 1862 first lieutenant November 4, 1862; resigned by reason of wounds, March 16, 1864.

Goodhue County had forty-two soldiers in Company D and one in Company F.

Fifth Infantry

The 5th Infantry was organized in May, 1862. Ordered to Pittsburg Landing May 9, 1862. A detachment of three companies remained in Minnesota, garrisoning frontier posts. Participated in the following marches, battles, sieges and skirmishes:

Siege of Corinth, April and May, 1862
The detachment in Minnesota engaged in battle with Indians at Redwood, Minnesota, August 18, 1862
Siege of Fort Ridgely, August 20, 21 and 22, 1862
Fort Abercrombie. D. T., August 1862
Regiment assigned to 16th army corps
Engaged in the battles of Iuka, September 18, 1862
Corinth, October 3 and 4, 1862; Jackson, Tennessee, May 14, 1863
Siege of Vicksburg; assault of Vicksburg, May 22, 1863
Mechanicsburg, June 3, 1863
Richmond, June 15, 1863
Fort De Russey, Louisiana, March 14, 1864
Red River expedition, March, April and May, 1864
Lake Chicat, June 6, 1864
Tupelo, June, 1864
Veteranized July 1864
Abbeyville, August 23, 1864
Marched in September, 1864, from Brownsville, Arkansas, to Cape Girardeau Missouri, thence by boat to Jefferson City, thence to Kansas state line, thence to St. Louis, Missouri
Ordered to Nashville, Tennessee, November, 1864
Engaged in battles at Nashville, December 16 and 17, 1864
Spanish Fort and Fort Blakeley, April, 1865
Mustered out at Demopolis, Alabama. September 6, 1865
Discharged at Fort Snelling

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company A. General L. F Hubbard, enlisted as a private December 19, 1861 promoted to captain February 20, 1862; lieutenant colonel March 25, 1862; colonel October 1862, and brigadier general December 16, 1864.

First Lieutenant Andrew A. Teele, enrolled December 19, 1861 promoted to captain of Company I November 18, 1862; resigned April 3, 1863.

Second Lieutenant William Arkins, enrolled March 24, 1862; promoted first lieutenant November 10, 1862; captain April 12, 1863; resigned August 22. 1864.

Company H. Captain Otis S. Clark, enrolled March 31, 1862; resigned July 7, 1863.

First Lieutenant Alonzo Morehouse, enrolled January 25, 1862; promoted captain September 2, 1863; discharged with the regiment.

Goodhue County had forty-six soldiers in Company A, one in Company D, three in Company G and thirty-nine in Company H.

Sixth Infantry

The 6th Infantry was organized in August 1862, and ordered on the expedition against the Indians
Detachment of 200 engaged in battle at Birch Cooley, September 2, 1862
The regiment participated in the battle at Wood Fake, September 22, 1862 
Garrisoned frontier posts from November 1862, until May, 1863, when ordered upon Indian expedition
Engaged with Indians July 24, 26 and 28. 1863.

Stationed at frontier posts from September 18, 1863, to June 5, 1864, when ordered to Helena, Arkansas.

Ordered to St. Louis. Missouri, November, 1864
New Orleans January 1865
Assigned to the 16th army corps, Participated in engagements of
Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, April. 1865
Discharged at Fort Snelling August 10, 1865

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company F. Captain Horace B. Wilson, mustered in October 1, 1862; discharged with the regiment.
First Lieutenant George W. Parker, mustered in October 1, 1862; discharged with the regiment.

Second Lieutenant Joseph F. Pingrey, mustered in October 1, 1862; discharged with the regiment.
Goodhue County had ninety-two soldiers in Company F and one in Company I.

Seventh Infantry

The 7th Infantry was organized in August, 1862, and ordered on expedition against the Indians.

Engaged in battle of:
Wood Lake September 22, 1862. Stationed at frontier posts until May 1863, when again ordered on an Indian expedition. Engaged with Indians July 24, 26 and 28, 1863.

Ordered to St. Louis, Missouri, October 7, 1863, thence to Paducah, Kentucky, April 1864, thence to Memphis, Tennessee, and assigned to 16th army corps, June 1864.

Participated in the following marches, battles, sieges and skirmishes:
Tupelo, July, 1864;
Tallahatchie. August 7 and 8, 1864.
Marched in pursuit of Price from Brownsville, Arkansas, to Cape Girardeau, thence by boat to Jefferson City, thence to Kansas line, thence to St. Louis, Missouri.
Battles in Nashville, Tennessee, December 15 and 16, 1864;
Spanish Port and Fort Blakely, April 1860.
Discharged at Port Snelling August 16, 1865.

 The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company G, Captain William C. Williston, enrolled August 13, 1863; resigned January 20, 1864.

First Lieutenant Herman Letcher, enrolled August 14, 1862; promoted captain February 6, 1864; discharged with the regiment.

Second Lieutenant Daniel Densmore, enrolled August 14, 1862; promoted first lieutenant February 6, 1864; commissioned major in 68th L. S. C. Infantry.

Goodhue County had ninety-one soldiers in Company G and two in Company F.

Eighth Infantry

The 8th Infantry was organized August 1, 1862. Stationed at frontier posts until May 1864, when ordered upon Indian expedition. Engaged in the following battles, sieges, skirmishes and marches:

Tat-cha-o-ku-tu, July 28, 1864:
Battle of the Cedars and Overall's Creek.

Ordered to Clifton. Tennessee, thence to Cincinnati, Ohio, thence to Washington, thence to Wilmington, thence to Newbern, North Carolina

Battles of Kingston, March 8, 9 and 10, 1865.
Mustered out at Charlotte, North Carolina, July 11, 1865.
Discharged at Fort Snelling.

 The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company H, Captain George G. McCoy, enrolled August 29, 1862; resigned March 16, 1865.

Goodhue County had five soldiers in Company F, one in Company G and thirty-five in Company H.

Eleventh Infantry

The 11th Infantry was organized in August, 1864. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn. Engaged in guarding railroad between Nashville and Louisville until mustered out of regiment, June 26, 1865.

The commissioned officer from Goodhue County was Major Martin Maginnis, enrolled August 13, 1864, as quartermaster; promoted major September 13, 1861: discharged with regiment.

Tenth Infantry

The 10th Infantry was organized in August, 1862.

Stationed at frontier posts until June, 1863, when ordered upon Indian expedition. Engaged with the Indians July 24, 26 and 28, 1863.

Ordered to St, Louis. Missouri, October, 1863, thence to Columbus, Kentucky, April 1864, thence to Memphis, Tennessee, June 1864, and assigned to the 16th army corps.

Participated in the following battles, marches, sieges and skirmishes:
Battle of Tupelo, July 13, 1865;
Oxford expedition, August, 1864.
Marched in pursuit of Price from Brownsville, Arkansas, to Cape Girardeau, thence by boat to Jefferson City, thence to Kansas state line, thence to St. Louis. Missouri.
Battles of Nashville, Tennessee, December 15 and 16, 1864;
Spanish Fork and Fort Blakely, April 1865.
Discharged at Fort Snelling August 19 1865.

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Company D, Captain William W. Phelps, enrolled September 8, 1862: resigned November 8, 1862.

First Lieutenant Charles L. Davis, enrolled August 27, 1862; promoted captain February 6 1864; discharged with the regiment.

Second Lieutenant William B. Williams, enrolled September 8, 1862; promoted first lieutenant February 16, 1864; discharged with the regiment.

Goodhue county had one soldier in Company A and seventy in Company D.

First Mounted Rangers Cavalry

The 1st Mounted Rangers Cavalry was organized in March, 1863. Stationed among frontier posts until May, 1863, when ordered upon Indian expedition. Engaged with Indians on July 24, 26 and 28, 1863. Stationed at frontier posts upon return of expedition until mustered out, between October 1, 1863 and December 30, 1863.

The commissioned officer from Goodhue County was Major John H. Parker, commissioned November 20, 1862; discharged with the regiment.

Brackett's Battalion Cavalry

Originally, the first, second and third companies of this cavalry organized October and November, 1861.

Ordered to Benton Barracks, Missouri, December, 1864.
Assigned to a regiment called Curtis' Horse.
Ordered to Fort Henry, Tennessee, February, 1862.
Names of regiment changed to 5th Iowa Cavalry, April, 1862, as companies G, D and K.
Engaged in the siege of Corinth, April, 1862.
Ordered to Fort Herman, Tennessee, August, 1862.
Veteranized February, 1864.

Ordered to Department of Northwest, 1864.
Ordered upon Indian expedition.
Engaged with Indians July 28 and August, 1864.
Mustered out by companies between May and June, 1866.

The commissioned officer from Goodhue County was:
Company D, Captain Ira Barton, commissioned December 4, 1863; discharged with the company.

Goodhue County had two soldiers in company A, one in Company C and two in company D.

Second Cavalry

The 2nd Cavalry was organized in January, 1864.

Ordered upon Indian expedition May, 1864.
Engaged with Indians July 28, 1864 August, 1864.
Stationed at frontier posts until mustered out of regiment by companies between November, 1865, and June 1866.

The commissioned officer from Goodhue County was:

Colonel Robert M. McLaren, commissioned January 13, 1864; discharged with the regiment.

Goodhue County had three soldiers in Company A, one in Company F, nine, in Company C, one in Company I, two in Company K and twelve in Company M.

Independent Cavalry

The Independent Cavalry was organized July 20, 1863.

Ordered to Pembina, Dakota Territory, October, 1863.

Ordered to Fort Abercrombie. Dakota Territory, May, 1864.

Stationed at above fort until mustered out in April and June. 1866.

The commissioned officer from Goodhue County was Second Lieutenant William F. Cross, Company A. commissioned July 10, 1863 promoted first lieutenant June 5, 1864; discharged with company.

Goodhue County had twenty-one soldiers in Company A, twelve in Company C and nine in Company D.

First Regiment Heavy Artillery Infantry

The 1st Regiment Heavy Artillery was organized in April, 1865.

Ordered to Chattanooga, Tennessee, and stationed at that post until mustered out of regiment, September, 1865.

The commissioned officers from Goodhue County were:

Colonel William Colvill, commissioned February 25, 1865; discharged by order. May 6, 1865.

Company I. Captain Thomas Carney, commissioned February 10, 1865; discharged with company.

Senior Second Lieutenant James H. Carney, commissioned February 10, 1865; discharged with company.

Goodhue County had one soldier in Company C, eight in Company G, four in Company H and one in Company I.

Second Battery Light Artillery

The 2nd Battery of Light Artillery was organized in December, 1861. Ordered to St. Louis, Missouri, April, 1862, thence to Corinth, May 1862.

Participated in the following inarches, battles, sieges and skirmishes:
Siege of Corinth, April 1862;
Bragg's raid.
Assigned to Army of the Tennessee.
Battle of Perryville, October 8 and 9, 1862;
Lancaster, October 12, 1862;
Knob Gap, December 20, 1862;
Stone River, December 30, 1862;
Tullahoma. Marched to Rome. Georgia, via Stephenson. Alabama.
Caperton's Ferry and Lookout Mountain:
Chickamauga, September 19 and 20, 1863;
Mission Ridge; Ringgold, Georgia.
Marched to relief of Knoxville, December 15 and 16, 1864.
Mustered out July 13, 1865; discharged at Fort Snelling.

Goodhue County had three soldiers in the 2nd Battery.

Colonel Hubbard's Bravery

Two instances of remarkable bravery evinced by soldiers from this county have become a part of our national history. The first was at the battle of Corinth, in October 1862. The report says that the "5th Minnesota closed the gap which saved the day at Corinth." The 5th Minnesota was at that time under the leadership of Colonel L. K. Hubbard, of this county. General Stanley, who commanded the division to which this regiment was attached, accords the above credit to it on the field of battle. The following extract from a Letter from General Rosecrans tells how the act was accomplished:
Colonel Colvill's Charge

The second was an act of the 1st Minnesota at the battle of Gettysburg, in July 1863. It appears that two companies had been detached as skirmishers, while the remaining eight companies, consisting of 262 men, were sent to the center of the tine, just vacated by Sickles advance to support battery C of the 4th United States Artillery. The following is quoted from the history of the regiment: "No other troops were then near us and we stood by this battery in full view of Sickles' troops in Peach Orchard, half a mile to the front. With the gravest apprehension we saw Sickles' men give way before the heavier forces of Longstreet and Hill and come back slowly at first and rallying at short intervals, but at length broken and in utter disorder, rushing down the slope, across the low ground and up the slope on our side and past our position to the rear, followed by a strong force. There was no organized force to oppose them except our handful of 262 men. Most soldiers in the face of the near advance of such an overpowering force would have caught the panic and joined the retreating masses. But the 1st Minnesota had never yet retired without orders, nor deserted any post, and desperate as the situation seemed, and as it was, they stood firm against whatever might come.

"Just then General Hancock, with a single aid rode up at full speed and for a moment vainly endeavored to rally Sickles' retreating force. Reserves had been sent for but were too far away to hope to reach the critical position until it would be occupied by the enemy, unless that enemy were stopped. Quickly leaving the fugitives, Hancock spurred to where we stood, calling out as he reached us. 'What regiment is this? '1st Minnesota.' replied Colonel Colvill. 'Charge those lines,' commanded Hancock. Every man realized in an instant what that order meant, death or wounds to us all; the sacrifice of the regiment to gain a few minutes' time and save the position, and probably the battlefield, and every man accepted the sacrifice, responding to Colvill 's orders, rapidly given. The regiment, in perfect line, with arms at 'right shoulder shift,' was in a moment sweeping down the slope directly upon the enemy's center. No hesitation, no stopping to fire, though the men fell fast at every stride, before the concentrated fire of the whole Confederate force directed upon us as soon as the movement was observed. Silently, without orders, and almost from the start, double-quick had changed to utmost speed, for in utmost speed lay the only hope that any of us would pass through that storm of lead and strike the enemy. 'Charge!' shouted Colvill. as we neared their first line; and with leveled bayonets at full speed, we rushed upon it; fortunately it was slightly disordered in crossing a dry run at the foot of the slope. The men were never made who will stand against leveled bayonets coming with such momentum and evident desperation. The first line broke as we reached it, and, rushed back through the second line, stopping the whole advance. We then poured in our first fire, and availing ourselves of such shelter as the low bank of the dry brook afforded, held the entire force at bay for a considerable time, and until our reserves appeared on the ridge we had left. Had the enemy rallied quickly to a countercharge, its great number would have crushed us in a moment. But the ferocity of our onset seemed to paralyze them for a time, and although they poured upon us terrible and continuous fire from the front and enveloping our flanks, they began to retire, and we were ordered back. What Hancock had given us to do was done thoroughly. The regiment had stopped the enemy, held back its mighty force and saved the position. But at what a sacrifice! Nearly every officer was dead of lay weltering with bloody wounds, our gallant colonel and every officer among them. Of the 262 men who made the charge, 215 lay upon the field stricken down by the rebel bullets; forty-seven were still in line, and not a man was missing." General Hancock, speaking of this charge, is reported to have said: 'There is no more gallant deed recorded in history. I ordered those men in there because I saw I must gain five minutes time. Reinforcements were coming on the run, but I knew before they could reach the threatened point the Confederates, unless checked, would seize the position. I would have ordered that regiment in if I had known that every man would be killed. It had to be done, and I was glad to find such a gallant body of men at hand willing to make the terrible sacrifice that the occasion demanded."

Colonel William Colvill, who was a figure of national prominence by reason of his memorable feat at Gettysburg, was of Scotch descent on his father's side and Irish on his mother's, his ancestors on both sides having participated in the American Revolution. He was born in Chautauqua County, New York, read law in the offices of Fillmore & Haven, in Buffalo, N. Y., and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He became a resident of Red Wing in 1854 and the following year established the Red Wing "Sentinel" a Democratic paper, which he conducted until the outbreak of the Civil War. He enlisted as captain in the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and was promoted for gallantry, to the colonelcy of the regiment, and finally mustered out of the service by reason of wounds, with the brevet rank of brigadier general. He was elected attorney general of the state in 1865, and was appointed register of the land office at Duluth by President Cleveland. He served in the house in 1878. His death occurred June 12, 1905. Memorials to his fame have not been lacking. A part of his farm is now the Colvill Memorial park, at Red Wing. In 1907 the state of Minnesota appropriated $10,000 for the erection in the capitol building of an heroic bronze figure of Colonel Colvill. A replica was also erected at the place of Colonel Colvill's burial in Cannon Falls. It is a lasting regret to Red Wing people that his remains did not find their last resting place in the city where he spent the greater part of his life

  Goodhue County |Minnesota AHGP 

Source: History of Goodhue County Minnesota, Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge, H. C. Cooper Jr, & Company, Chicago, 1909.

 

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